Don't want to type your concern or question, talk to a patient survivor on the phone! HOPEline 800-579-1970
August 27, 2014, 10:05:14 PM PDT *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News: KidneySpace members please only share your experience, strength and hope with each other. We do not give advice. Always consult with a healthcare professional before making any changes to your medical regimen.    
 
   Home   Help Search Calendar Login Register RSN Home The HOPEline RSNhope store  
Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: weight loss to increase GFR  (Read 9215 times)
0 Members and 3 Guests are viewing this topic.
tyefly
Newbie
*
Posts: 84
Offline
cichlid fish
« on: August 15, 2009, 11:23:43 AM PDT »

  I have the results of my blood work and now I am down to GFR 11.  I am concerned about having to start dialysis before my fistula is ready as I had it placed only 4 weeks ago..... I was wondering if I go on a very restricted diet (calorie wise)  if I can possibly increase my GFR.... I am thinking of loosing roughly 30 lbs in the next few weeks.... I am going to increase my exercise to several hours a day.... I already walk my dogs for 1-2 hours a day, but I think I will get on the treadmill and start walking more...( I usually use the trendmill in winter when its raining ), maybe start riding the bike...( I haven't done that in a few years).    I am scared of starting dialysis......  I have completed my transplant evaluations and I am now sending in my live donors to be tested...They said that can take a few months too...  I have been planning to go on a trip in two weeks to a secluded forest service cabin in the woods to spend a couple of weeks, hiking, fishing, and most of all relaxing. I am concerned about my health.... all of this has come so fast..... as I had good GFR in March and now....well  gee.....  So  has anyone has any experience with weight loss and increased kidney function.... Will exercise buy me some more time......  I need to buy some time....I am not ready.......

View Profile Logged
nerak06m
Jr. Member
**
Posts: 158
Offline
« Reply #1 on: August 15, 2009, 11:59:10 AM PDT »

Hi, Tyefly.......I don't know about weight loss, but I know I've managed to avoid dialysis for almost 5 years now & I believe that the way I eat (well, most of the time  Shocked)  is a big part of it. Yeah, I cheat once in a while, but for the most part, I cook pretty much everything I eat, so I know what I'm eating. And when I'm out, I try to eat make the best choices I can. Are you paying attention to protein, phosphorus, potassium, sodium, etc? Do you take phosphate binders? This is the best way I know of to slow down the progression.........And so far, so good................ Smiley

View Profile Logged
getlife
Thank you to my donor family for the 'Gift of Life' !
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 4530
Offline
So Thankful!
« Reply #2 on: August 15, 2009, 12:25:01 PM PDT »

Tyefly,
If you can do all that, you must be doing well!  Just like nerak06m had asked, are you watching the intake of these minerals?  Does your nephrologist have you on a 'low protein" diet?  Just curious..that is usually what is done...everyone is an individual and its solely up to your Doctor.  Some patients are not put on the Renal diet,  keep us posted.

View Profile Logged

Live! Like there's tomorrow! 
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9K8-9mXjU8o

CKD 40 Years!

Update!  Had my transplant on June 22, 2011!
Woohoo! A sincere thank you to my donor family.

2 previous transplants, latter lasting 18 years.
Returned to hemodialysis 1999. 
Now transplanted!
tyefly
Newbie
*
Posts: 84
Offline
cichlid fish
« Reply #3 on: August 15, 2009, 12:46:43 PM PDT »

Oh   yes   low protein diet, was given the renal diet and I am following that....  My Potassium has not been a problem...in fact last year I was always pretty low... with the diuretics that I take the potassium stay low.... Phosphates are low too.... I have been doing the tums several times a day....with each meal.... I am not hungry and well the food thing is like a thing of the past..... I remember when I use to really look forward to certain types of foods..... now I just don't get that feeling anymore.... Hard to get excited when everyone wants a steak on the BBQ and deep down inside you know you should but you don't.....  Calcium is low.... taking more vit d... doing the oral iron.... just started the epo a couple of weeks ago....(hope that is not what took my GFR down.)   I am not dehydrated... but i do try to keep the water weight off.....      I am thinking that I am going to just go on a big starvation diet and loose a whole lot of weight in the next two weeks...... drink a bunch of water  and eat almost nothing.... I don't usually do this type of weight loss..... but I am getting desperate....  I need to buy more time...... 

View Profile Logged
Dez
Jr. Member
**
Posts: 243
Offline
« Reply #4 on: August 15, 2009, 07:22:28 PM PDT »

It's not wise to start any diet, especially a "starvation" diet, without checking with your physician or dietician.  Even with kidney disease, a person's body needs adequate nutrition and a variety of nutrients.

View Profile Logged
Marina
Sr. Member
****
Posts: 847
Offline
Believe!!!!!!!!!!!
« Reply #5 on: August 15, 2009, 10:32:15 PM PDT »

Check with your Dr  if  exercising  more  is  a  wise thing  to do.   The  more  you  exercise the  higher your  creatinine  will be, the higher the  creatinine the lower  your  GFR. 
The  formula  used to  determine  GFR  is  based on  creatinine,  age,   gender and  ethnic  background.

 

View Profile Logged

Diabetes  since  1979
CAPD    April 2004-Nov  2010
Nov 9, 2010 I  was  blessed with   the  GIFT  OF  LIFE  (kidney and pancreas  TX )
God  bless  my  donor  and donor  family  for  such  wonderful  gift!!!   Smiley
Angie
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 2310
Offline
Canadian Transplant Recipient
« Reply #6 on: August 16, 2009, 01:29:01 AM PDT »

Check with your Dr  if  exercising  more  is  a  wise thing  to do.   The  more  you  exercise the  higher your  creatinine  will be, the higher the  creatinine the lower  your  GFR. 
The  formula  used to  determine  GFR  is  based on  creatinine,  age,   gender and  ethnic  background.

 

It is important to not get Creatinine confused with Creatine.

Creatinine:
Quote
Creatinine (from the Greek kreas, flesh) is a break-down product of creatine phosphate in muscle, and is usually produced at a fairly constant rate by the body (depending on muscle mass). Chemically, creatinine is a spontaneously formed cyclic derivative of creatine. Creatinine is chiefly filtered out of the blood by the kidneys, though a small amount is actively secreted by the kidneys into the urine. There is little-to-no tubular reabsorption of creatinine. If the filtering of the kidney is deficient, blood levels rise. Therefore, creatinine levels in blood and urine may be used to calculate the creatinine clearance (CrCl), which reflects the glomerular filtration rate (GFR). The GFR is clinically important because it is a measurement of renal function. However, in cases of severe renal dysfunction, the creatinine clearance rate will be "overestimated" because the active secretion of creatinine will account for a larger fraction of the total creatinine cleared. Ketoacids, cimetidine and trimethoprim reduce creatinine tubular secretion and therefore increase the accuracy of the GFR estimate, particularly in severe renal dysfunction. (In the absence of secretion, creatinine behaves like inulin.)

A more complete estimation of renal function can be made when interpreting the blood (plasma) concentration of creatinine along with that of urea. BUN-to-creatinine ratio (the ratio of urea to creatinine) can indicate other problems besides those intrinsic to the kidney; for example, a urea level raised out of proportion to the creatinine may indicate a pre-renal problem such as volume depletion.

Men tend to have higher levels of creatinine because they generally have more skeletal muscle mass than women. Vegetarians have been shown to have lower creatinine levels.

Creatine
Quote
Creatine is a nitrogenous organic acid that occurs naturally in vertebrates and helps to supply energy to muscle. Creatine was identified in 1832 when Michel Eugène Chevreul discovered it as a component of skeletal muscle, which he later named creatine after the Greek word for flesh, Kreas.


But yeah with any change you make in regiment you should ALWAYS check with your medical team. They might even know of a better way to accomplish what you want to achieve.
« Last Edit: August 16, 2009, 01:30:32 AM PDT by Angie »

View Profile WWW Logged

My Pictures | KK Mall | http://kidney.ca/quiz



PD/HD: 6.75 yrs
2nd Transplant 2007 Sept 30th (started working Nov 14)
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to: