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Author Topic: Clothing for Staying Warm In Center HemoDialysis  (Read 4570 times)
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Angie
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« on: June 10, 2009, 10:52:03 PM PDT »

Ever get cold in in-center Hemo Dialysis? I have many times beings that I am in Canada. Not sure about you guys but Livecam said I should post this information I have so I will Smiley

I have a shirt so I know first hand how much I enjoyed this. What am I talking about? I am talking about sweatshirts with zippers in the sleeve or location of the PermCath or sweatpants with zipper in the leg.

Of course I suppose you can make this yourself but I am terrible at sewing so while I was on Hemodialysis in center I bought one and used it. I was sure glad I had it Smiley

The site is www.accesswear.com Smiley

Here is a video of me showing mine off that I got 2 years ago:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mc47vwURfQQ

Quote
Dialysis patient sews comfortable, discreet clothing
BY ELIZABETH BASSETT
March 10, 2008


Three days a week Lucy Coronado gets up at 3:30 a.m. to eat breakfast and take a shower. She and her son, Tony Coronado, get into a car and he drives her to her standing appointment, which lasts until about 10 a.m.

Lucy Coronado spends three mornings a week getting hemodialysis, a procedure that circulates the blood out of her body, cleans it, and then returns it to her body because her kidneys cant properly clean the blood anymore. One problem of this procedure

is that access to a patients blood can only come from certain areas of the body, many of which arent necessarily readily flaunted.

From her experience and the experience of being with other dialysis patients, Coronado saw a need for comfortable,

discreet clothing. A seamstress and tailor by trade, she quickly developed outfits specifically for dialysis patients, and her growing new business, LGC Inc., may soon be able to offer clothes to men and women across the country.

I was tired of doing the Janet Jackson thing, said Coronado, who had a temporary access site on the right side of her chest. She had to uncover her chest and stay uncovered for hours in a cold dialysis clinic, next to other patients who have to expose various parts of their bodies by unbuttoning shirts, taking off trousers or hiking up skirts.

You have to be in the chair to understand exposing yourself like that, Coronado said.

Coronado, who is 74, will need to get dialysis for the rest of her life. So instead of partially undressing for treatment several times a week, she started fiddling with Velcro and zippers on shirts, making windows that would allow clinicians access to her blood while still keeping her warm and comfortable.

After some experimenting, she developed shirts that had zippers on either side of the chest and along the sleeves for upper body access and pants with zippers up near the groin and along the lower leg for different access points.

Jill Miller, a licensed clinical social worker who works at Trinity Dialysis Center, where Coronado goes for treatment, said that clinicians prefer to access a patient through the arm but that catheters in the chest or access near the groin may be necessary.

Miller said that many patients are dealing with other illnesses that contributed to the kidney failure and need for dialysis, like diabetes (the No. 1 disease that causes kidney failure) and heart problems.

Dialysis is maybe the least of their problems, Miller said.

Approximately 26 million Americans have chronic kidney disease, according to the National Kidney Foundation, and Miller said that because the early stages are asymptomatic, hundreds of thousands of people are probably walking around untreated when blood and urine tests could diagnose the illness.

Tony Coronado, who along with his brother, Robert Coronado, lends whatever help is needed at LGC. He said that some health care workers have seen the garments his mother wears one of these outfits for all of her dialysis appointments and said that even other people, like cancer patients, could benefit from the numerous access points.

We never even thought about it. We were just doing it and people said, Oh, we could use this too, he said.

Right now, the Coronados are working with a patent attorney to protect their designs. Once the garments are tested more rigorously, Lucy Coronado wants to ramp up production and reach patients in dialysis centers across Fort Worth, across the state and across the nation.

Developing and making the garments is not difficult for Coronado, who began sewing when she was 13 or 14, during World War II. She was able to get herself hired to help make khaki uniforms for soldiers, and then moved on to making formal dress uniforms at a store downtown. She learned how to tailor, and became a head tailor before opening her own shop off Berry Street in 1968. She retired and closed shop shortly after starting dialysis.

I opened on a Monday, and by Saturday I had six stores I was doing alterations for, she said.

Coronados children, including daughter Michelle, who does bridal alterations and has her own shop on Berry Street now, all spent time after school in her shop. Now her children are helping her again as she keeps busy with LGC.

This is my therapy, Coronado said. The LGC store, at 4620 Granbury Road, opens late on Monday, Wednesday and Friday, but is open all day on Tuesday and Thursday.

Miller said that Coronados efforts with her growing business are amazing.

In the midst of having to face this, she just kind of pulled up her boot straps and went for it, she said.

Coronado is hoping to turn sewing into a sort of therapy for some of her fellow patients. Since she sees them several times a week for sometimes years at a time, she sees them go through the ups and downs of dealing with a chronic illness. She said that many of them become despondent because its hard to hold down a full-time job, but she wants to teach some the basics of sewing, alterations and fittings, so that they could find part-time work in a department store or cleaners and have something to focus on.

They dont have to be just dialysis, she said.

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joeynt
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« Reply #1 on: June 17, 2009, 08:27:16 PM PDT »

Some of the patients on the evening shift have velcro fastenings so they can remove their shirt sleeves or they have zippers so they can open the area they need to expose for access.  I thought they were a great idea when I saw them.  My access is low enough on my arm that I just leave on my sweat jacket during the cold months.  However winter or summer I always take colorful socks to wear so I can take off my shoes.  I found a small fleece blanket at a lawn sale and it folds down to fit in my backpack.  Its light enough I can use it summer or winter.  I hate being cold so I try to come prepared. 

P.S. Another thing the nurses advised me to do (which I admit I seldom remember) is to bring a snack for after dialysis.

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Monsterman
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« Reply #2 on: November 11, 2009, 07:08:42 PM PST »

Those are awesome!!! I go to my Unit almost 3 layers of clothes only to have to take them off so they can put the BP Cuff on and access my Fistula I freeze for 3 1/2 hours almost.. I am ordering a few of these right away and will be printing the website page so others can see/share!! Great stuff!

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Chris
Angie
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« Reply #3 on: November 16, 2009, 10:15:01 AM PST »

Those are awesome!!! I go to my Unit almost 3 layers of clothes only to have to take them off so they can put the BP Cuff on and access my Fistula I freeze for 3 1/2 hours almost.. I am ordering a few of these right away and will be printing the website page so others can see/share!! Great stuff!

Glad this information helped you! Smiley  When you get yours you can even share with us what you look like in it if you like Wink

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Monsterman
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« Reply #4 on: November 17, 2009, 11:33:16 PM PST »

Quote from: Angie[/quote

Glad this information helped you! Smiley  When you get yours you can even share with us what you look like in it if you like Wink

Yeah you bet I dont mind throwing up a picture of me  Cool
« Last Edit: May 25, 2010, 07:45:33 PM PDT by Monsterman »

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Chris
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